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biomorphosis:

Potoo is a bizarre, nocturnal birds that are rarely seen during the day. They are master of disguise and can easily mistaken for a tree branch. They are monogamous and lay a single egg but place it in the nook of a branch or broken off stem instead of building an actual nest.

Their vocalization has frightened many locals, given rise to folktales throughout its range. According to legend, the call of the Potoo is the mournful lament of a spirit in love with but separated from the spirit of the moon.

biomorphosis:

A young tarsier prowling at night.

biomorphosis:

A young tarsier prowling at night.

biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

This agency is called “Wildlife Services” (real twist on the use of benign words) is under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Other agencies call the people who work here “gopher chokers.” They are accountable to nobody other than themselves. They disclose little information. Their killing activities are funded 50% by US taxpayers and 50% by the corporation or rancher or farmer who wants to get rid of “varmints” that are threatening the crops or herds. Note that the Agency killed over 300,000 red-winged blackbirds, among other creatures. What is that about? Well, it seems the birds like to eat sunflower seeds, which is a threat to sunflower seed farmers. I guess scarecrows aren’t good enough enough, so have to call in the sanctioned killers, i.e., U.S. Government employees.

From the Center for Biological Diversity:

Thousands of animals gasp their final breaths in neck snares that sometimes ensnare legs or entire torsos leading to lengthy struggles before death.

Others, caught in traps that go unchecked for weeks at a time, die slow, excruciating deaths from starvation, thirst or heat.

Still others asphyxiate from poisonous fumigants placed in their dens — sometimes after hours of painful convulsions.

This unregulated and highly unnecessary annual slaughter of bears, foxes, otters, eagles, songbirds and dozens of other species is the ongoing legacy of the highly secretive Wildlife Services, which just since 1996 has shot, snared and poisoned more than 22 million native animals.

The number is likely much higher. Because of a quirk in how the agency was set up by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, its activities are not guided by the kind of legally binding regulations that typically structure other federal agencies and require transparency.

As a result, Wildlife Services operates without the guidance of a broad public mission and allows virtually no public scrutiny. Instead, the agency works almost entirely as a covert livestock industry-guided wildlife extermination service. And that must change.

Maybe this is one of the pups of Wolf OR-7.
This July 12, 2014 image released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, shows what is believed to be a pup of OR-7 seen in a screen grab from a remote trail camera in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Ore. New photos show that Oregon’s famous wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three pups that he and a mate are raising in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist John Stephenson said Friday, July 25, 2014 that the photos show two gray pups. (AP Photo/U.S. | ASSOCIATED PRESS

Maybe this is one of the pups of Wolf OR-7.

This July 12, 2014 image released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, shows what is believed to be a pup of OR-7 seen in a screen grab from a remote trail camera in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Ore. New photos show that Oregon’s famous wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three pups that he and a mate are raising in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist John Stephenson said Friday, July 25, 2014 that the photos show two gray pups. (AP Photo/U.S. | ASSOCIATED PRESS

Couple of new wildfires in Northern California, one threatening vineyards and the other near Yosemite National Park (again). The big Oregon fire is closer to containment (95%). The Carlton Complex fire in Washington (390 square miles) is 60% contained.

Article in Huffington Post here.